It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt. — Abraham Lincoln

American History Stories—Volume IV - Mara L. Pratt




Battle of Mill Spring---1862

In the battle of Mill Spring, the Confederates were put to flight by the Yankees.

One gentleman, whose slave had been sent with the Confederates into this battle, was questioning Sambo about what he had seen. Oftentimes these negroes were much brighter than their masters gave them credit for being.

"Well, Sambo, how long did it take you to march to the battle-field?"

"'Bout four days, massa," was the reply.

"That was pretty good marching, I'm sure. How long did it take you to march back?"

"'Bout two days, massa."

Only two days! why, that's strange. I shouldn't suppose soldiers after a long battle could march faster than before it."

"Dunno nuffin 'bout dat, massa; but I speck the music make de difference. You see, we marched there to the tune of Dixie; but we come back to tune of Fire! fire! fire! Run boys! Run!"