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Saul is Jealous of David

After David had slain Goliath, Saul took him into his own house and would not let him return any more to his father's people. Jonathan, the son of Saul, loved David as he loved his own soul, and stripped himself of his robe and his garments, and his bow, and his sword, and gave them all to David.

David went wherever Saul sent him and behaved wisely. He was set over the soldiers and they followed him gladly; he went among the people and they found him wise and kind; he dealt with the servants justly and they loved him.

It happened that when the people of Israel returned from the slaughter of the Philistines, that the women came out of all the cities, singing and dancing, to meet the soldiers. As they danced and sang they said: "Saul has slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands."

When Saul heard them say this he was very angry, and cried out: "They have given David ten thousand, and to me only a thousand. What can he have more than my kingdom itself?" And Saul began to envy David, and looked upon him with evil and jealous eyes, for the people honored him more than they did the king himself.

The evil spirit came again upon Saul, and David played upon his harp to soothe the king. Saul sat before him thinking evil thoughts that he could not banish, and his javelin was in his hand. As David played upon the harp, Saul cast his javelin at him, not only once but twice, thinking to slay him. But David escaped from his presence, believing it was the evil spirit that made Saul attempt his life.

Saul was now afraid of David, because the Lord was with him, and because he behaved wisely in all his ways. He thought to be rid of David by making him fight the Philistines, hoping some day they would slay him. So he made him captain over his soldiers.

Now, Michal, the daughter of Saul, loved David and was willing to marry him. When Saul heard of it he was pleased and said: "I will give her to him that she may be a snare to him and that the hand of the Philistines may be against him." And he sent his servants secretly to tell David that he could have Michal for his wife.

But David said: "I am a poor man, and it is no light thing to be a king's son-in-law." But Saul sent an answer that all David had to do was to kill a hundred Philistines and Saul would be satisfied to have him for a son-in-law.

So David rose and went with his men and slew two hundred Philistines and word was brought to Saul that they were slain. He could do no otherwise than give Michal to be David's wife, but he feared David more and more and was his enemy continually.

Saul told Jonathan and all his servants that they must kill David. Jonathan warned David and made him hide in a secret place until his father's anger had passed. But Saul began to fear David more and more, especially when David would return from the slaughter of the Philistines and the people would sing his praises.

Again the evil spirit came upon Saul, and David played upon the harp to soothe him. Again the king cast his javelin at David to slay him, but again David escaped from the wrath of the king, and the javelin smote the wall.

Saul sent messengers to David's house to watch him, and to slay him in the morning, but Michal, his wife, told David: "If you do not save yourself tonight, tomorrow you will be slain." So Michal let David down through a window, so that he escaped those who watched him outside, and fled to Samuel at Ramah, and told him all that Saul had done to him. Then he and Samuel went to live in Naioth.